07.11.2005

07.06.2005

07.05.2005

06.27.2005

06.20.2005

06.13.2005

06.06.2005

05.30.2005

05.23.2005

05.16.2005

05.09.2005

05.02.2005

04.25.2005

04.18.2005

04.11.2005

04.04.2005

03.28.2005

03.21.2005

03.14.2005

03.07.2005

02.28.2005

02.21.2005

02.14.2005

02.07.2005

01.31.2005

01.24.2005

01.17.2005

01.10.2005

01.03.2005

12.27.2004

12.20.2004

12.13.2004

12.06.2004

11.29.2004

11.22.2004

11.15.2004

11.08.2004

11.01.2004

10.25.2004

10.18.2004

10.11.2004

10.04.2004

09.27.2004

09.20.2004

09.13.2004

09.06.2004

08.30.2004

08.23.2004

08.16.2004

08.09.2004

08.02.2004

07.26.2004

07.19.2004

07.12.2004

07.05.2004

06.28.2004

06.21.2004

06.14.2004

06.07.2004

05.31.2004

05.24.2004

05.17.2004

05.10.2004

05.03.2004

04.26.2004

04.19.2004

04.12.2004

04.05.2004

03.29.2004

03.22.2004

03.15.2004

03.08.2004

03.01.2004

02.23.2004

02.16.2004

02.09.2004

02.02.2004

01.26.2004

01.19.2004

01.12.2004

01.05.2004

12.29.2003

12.22.2003

12.15.2003

12.08.2003

12.01.2003

11.24.2003

11.17.2003

11.10.2003

11.03.2003

10.27.2003

10.20.2003

10.13.2003

10.06.2003

09.29.2003

09.22.2003

09.15.2003

09.08.2003

09.01.2003

08.25.2003

08.18.2003

08.11.2003

08.04.2003

07.28.2003

07.21.2003

07.14.2003

07.07.2003

06.30.2003

06.19.2003

11.25. 2002

To read a column, click on its title

Return to "developed world,"

Craig’s list of questions

Out with the old, in with the new

Things fall apart

Last visit to Kaédi

Renter blues resolved

Renter blues

Buckets of miscommunications

Sleeping outside

Heat and dust

Chained to the computer

Weekend with Elvis

Passover in Nouakchott

Doing the workweek shuffle

COS: the beginning of the end

Back to NKC, clean and hot

The Gambia

Sierra Leone

Guinea

The way work gets done?

Slow news week

First-years in Nouakchott en masse

Mission possible

The NQ/NC Tour

What’s the meaning of life?

Mbareck lay-ee-duh

ISERI loves company

Culture encounters

Visitors galore

Big changes in three weeks

Burkina Faso

The end of the Dogon trek

They spell it “Tombouctou”

Carl, Thanksgiving, and Bamako

Polio eradication campaign

Five-day weekend

Chez Lisa

Chilling in Nouadhibou

Ramadan, 1425

Rainbows, lollipops, roses, and….

Same continent, different world

On the road in Tunisia

Tunis: wow!

Getting out of town

Saidou's wedding

MTR x 2

I must be on vacation

Relationships

Return to Kaédi

Locust iste

Visit from the OIG

Teaching Mamouni how to fish

A visit from Trader Jigs

May les forces be with you

Welcome to our new trainees

Random acts of kindness

Writing, writing, writing!

Hanging out with the ENS crowd

Breakfast with Babah

Slow news week

Good news for me!

Chugging along

The Volunteer's new clothes

Back "home" again

Cabo Verde, second week

Cabo Verde, first week

This year in Dakar

April fish

The teachers gather

Anthropology lessons

Racism, Mauritania style

Babah and Ismail

Back to "normal"

Muslim new year 1425

Eight months and counting

Windy and gritty

Glutton for mutton

Counterpart bleus, part deux

Singing the counterpart blues

ETR, IST, and PCVRC

The search for authenticity

Meet me in Saint-Louis (Senegal)

Focus on the children of Africa

The yin and the yang

Work unfolds

The giving of thanks

Work! At last! (sort of)

A week in Chinguetti

Education in the RIM

Adventures in banking

Running with the Hash House Harriers

Life at the office

Getting to work, at last

This is my life

This little piggy

Settling in

Center Days and swearing in

A little bit of this and that

Model School and a wedding

Center Days once more

Site Visit

Nouakchott to Kaédi and back

Second week in Nouakchott

The Nouakchott hotshots

The way things (don't) work

A few minor adjustments

Welcome to Kaédi

Staging in Philadelphia

Thoughts on the threshold of change

Why the Peace Corps?

 

 

Jay was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Mauritania, West Africa from 2003 - 2005.

 

       As an experienced teacher, Jay worked with Mauritania's Ministry of Education as a curriculum development specialist. He worked on the design and production of a national English syllabus, revising and rewriting existing textbooks, producing English textbooks, teaching English to adults, and teacher training.

       After his first year in Mauritania, Jay was asked by the Peace Corps to revise the existing written materials about Mauritanian culture, so that the new manual could be used for the 2004 training class. You can learn a lot about Mauritanian culture by reading this Cross-Culture Manual.

       After Saidou's wedding (post of 09.13.2004, below) Jay got to thinking about the phenomenon of cousins marrying, which is more the rule than the exception in Mauritania. He wrote an e-mail to Cecil Adams, author of The Straight Dope, and his question was answered in the column a few weeks later.

      In October, 2004 Peace Corps Director Gaddi Vasquez addressed a National Press Club luncheon and announced that Muslim countries were increasingly asking for volunteers. A United Press International reporter interviewed Jay for an article about this topic.

     Many Peace Corps volunteers have stayed with Jay in his apartment in Nouakchott. They have enjoyed his regal surroundings and have named it Chateau Jay. If you would like to take a brief video tour of his apartment, click on Chateau Jay

      Jay wrote about his experiences and posted here. All reports reflect Jay's activities. Opinions are his own and do not represent Peace Corps policy.

 

      You can read the journals of Peace Corps Volunteers in Mauritania, as well as those in other parts of the world, by locating them at this website:

http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com

 

 

        To contact Jay, write to him at teacher@jaydavidson.com