Organized for success - part 2

 

            The first step to take when you want to get your family organized for success is to purge what is no longer useful.

             Things that you are not using are in the way! These items form a barrier between your family members and their successful lives. Many children have too many possessions crammed into their closets, drawers, and all over their rooms. Time spent working with the family to weed out unwanted and unneeded excess in their rooms is productive. Your children probably have more books, clothing, and toys than they need or want, so help them to sort through it all.

             One way to appeal to children to weed out such articles is to explain that there are other people who need and can use what they donít : children who have no books of their own, very few toys, or a limited selection of clothing from which to choose.

             There are three major benefits of this activity. First of all, your child has a sense of contributing to another person. Secondly, this frees up some space for navigating more freely in his own room. Thirdly, you teach the lesson that it is all right to get rid of things.

             Most of us are so busy with our lives that we donít take the time to implement this step. Make and keep an appointment with yourselves to accomplish this task. Perhaps you can devote the first day of a vacation to the effort; the approach of a childís birthday could be a benchmark you will use; the beginning or end of a school year is an ideal time. When you do it is not nearly as important as that you do it!

             You have an opportunity to participate in this effort by joining in the Palo Alto Recycling Programís City-Wide Garage Sale, being held this Saturday.  See the full-page ad in todayís Daily News. You may also visit the website at www.city.palo-alto.ca.us/garagesale.

             Next week, a professional organizer with a new book gives simple advice that all families can follow.

  
This column has been incorporated and expanded in Teach Your Children Well: A Teacherís  Advice for Parents.

All columns are copyright © Jay Davidson.  Permission is hereby granted for individuals to download and copy them for individual use.  There is a modest charge for printing these columns in any publication.  To receive that permission, contact   Jay Davidson